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Build connections. Advance practice. Inspire change.
October 19-21, 2016 San Francisco, California

One of our many T2 partners, Center for Youth Wellness, is hosting a conference on Adverse Childhood Experiences.
Register for the 2016 Conference today at
http://www.aces-ca.org/register-new/

To learn more about Center for Youth Wellness, click here

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Trauma Transformed
launches regional effort in SF Bay Area

Nearly 300 impassioned and committed people crowded into the Green Room at the San Francisco War Memorial and Performing Arts Center last week to launch Trauma Transformed. Known as T2, the regional effort – representing the San Francisco Department of Public Health and seven Bay Area counties – is funded by a four-year, $4-million grant from the U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).

To continue reading this article by ACEs Connection community facilitator Alicia St. Andrews click here.


We are very proud to announce that we are a finalist for the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s (SAMHSA) 2016 Excellence in Community Communications and Outreach (ECCO) Recognition Program!

Our entry is one of three finalists in the Strategy: Communications/Social Marketing Planning category. The winners in each category will be announced on Wednesday, August 18, at 3 p.m. EDT during the live webinar. Be sure to check out our work and vote for us to be the People’s Choice award winner! Then, tune in on August 18 at 3pm EDT for SAMSHA’s live webinar to vote for the People’s Choice Award: https://nasmhpd.adobeconnect.com/ecco2016/

The communication objective for the Trauma Transformed entry is to inform, interest, and invite community partners, workforce staff, counties, agencies, and institutions into collaborating with each other to build a Bay Area Regional Trauma-Informed System of Care.

The ECCO entry was part of our social marketing plan to communicate and promote the regional effort for alignment, resources sharing, and workforce development around trauma-informed practices and principles.

Trauma in the Wake of Tragedies

We here at Trauma Transformed grieve with our collective communities impacted by violence and trauma. While we hope for collective healing, the Bay Area community stands in solidarity with Orlando this time of profound loss and grief. Please feel free to use or share the following resources from the National Council Behavioral Health.
Sincerely, the Trauma Transformed Bay Area Team

In the wake of harrowing tragedies like the Orlando massacre, people far and wide can experience trauma—even if they were not directly involved in the event. And the signs don’t necessarily manifest themselves right away. They may appear later. But we can help. All of us can help someone who struggles with trauma—whether you work in the medical community, you are just another caring individual or you are a mental health or addictions provider.

In that vein, the National Council for Behavioral Health would like to share a few resources with you:

We hope these resources are helpful—whether you find them informative or want to share them with others in your community.

Paper Tigers

Filmmaker James Redford's compelling film PAPER TIGERS which captures the pain, the danger, the beauty, and the hopes of struggling teens - and the teachers armed with new science and fresh approaches that are changing their lives for the better.

Paper Tigers is an intimate look into the real lives of selected students at Lincoln High School in Walla Walla, WA, an alternative school that specializes in educating traumatized youth. The film intimately examines the inspiring promise of Trauma Informed Communities - a movement that is showing great promise in healing youth struggling with the dark legacy of Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACES).

Exposure to chronic and adverse stress (and the altered brain function that results) leaves a child in a fruitless search for comfort and escape from a brain and body that is permanently stuck in flight or fight. That comfort comes in the form of drugs, cigarettes, alcohol, sex, food and more. Every year, millions of unloved and traumatized youth enter adulthood with damaged brains and hearts. They are highly predisposed to die from self-destructive behaviors, and highly likely to continue the cycle of abuse.

The impact of unloved and traumatized children on society is profound and widespread. 85% of inmates were traumatized as youth. Hurt kids grow up to hurt people. The generational cycles of trauma and abuse are as stubborn as they are tragic.
But there is hope.

A movement is rising, one that sees aberrant behavior in children as a symptom rather than a moral failing. This movement asks not what is wrong with our youth, but rather what has happened to them. With this shifting paradigm comes the promise of great improvements in many of the society's costly ills: less crime, less illness, less teen pregnancy, abuse, rape, divorce.

Simply put, it is cheaper to heal than to punish. Paper Tigers takes a look at what is possible.